Urgent Repairs for Rental Properties

By Emma Smith

It is the landlord or owner’s responsibility to ensure a rented property is maintained in good repair. The Residential Tenancies Act 1997 distinguishes between urgent and non-urgent repairs.

Under the Residential Tenancies Act 1997, urgent repairs in a rental properties are:

• burst water service
• blocked or broken toilet system
• serious roof leak
• gas leak
• dangerous electrical fault
• flooding or serious flood damage
• serious storm or fire damage
• failure or breakdown of any essential service or appliance provided by a landlord or agent for hot water, water, cooking, heating, or laundering
• failure or breakdown of the gas, electricity or water supply
• any fault or damage in the premises that makes the premises unsafe or insecure
• an appliance, fitting or fixture that is not working properly and causes a substantial amount of water to be wasted
• a serious fault in a lift or staircase.

As your managing agent, we are legally obligated to respond to urgent repairs as quickly as possible. In some instances, we may arrange trades to attend the property as a matter of urgency, particularly if we are concerned about electrical safety, etc. We would prefer to be pro-active and take steps to prevent further damage or costly repairs.

Up to Date

Latest News


    There’s an established way of doing things for the average Australian first home buyer. It usually involves saving for years to put together a deposit, before paying down a mortgage over a decade or so – but it doesn’t have to be this way. Rentvestment, or renting the property you live … Read more

    Read Full Post


    Buying your first home in Australia can be extremely challenging. Banks are tightening their purse strings, prices in most capital cities are still on the rise, and young Australians are finding it more and more difficult to take that first step up the property ladder. The Real Estate Institute of Australia’s … Read more

    Read Full Post