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What is a condition report?

By Emma Smith

When a bond is paid, a landlord or owner must prepare a condition report which notes the general condition of the property, room or caravan, including fittings and fixtures. The landlord must complete this report before you move in and give the tenant or resident two copies.

The condition report is important because it can be used as evidence if there is a dispute about who should pay for cleaning or damage, particularly at the end of a tenancy.

Tenants and landlords should sign the condition report that reflects their respective observations of the property. If possible, both tenants and landlords should take photographs of the property before the lease begins to show its original condition.

Even if no bond has been paid, Consumer Affairs Victoria recommends completing a condition report as it can assist in settling any disputes about the condition of the property.

Information for tenants and residents

Your landlord or owner must give you two copies of the signed condition report before you move in.

Check that each item on the condition report is reported accurately and return one copy to your landlord or owner within three business days of moving in.

If you are returning the condition report by mail to or from a country area, allow an extra two days for postal delivery times.

Keep your copy of the condition report until the end of your tenancy or residency.

It is important for you to keep a copy in case there is a dispute over damage to the property. It is a good idea to take photos of the property at the start of your tenancy, particularly of any damage present and keep those photos with your condition report.

Your landlord or owner may be entitled to claim some or all of the bond for cleaning or repairs at the end of the tenancy or residency.

If the condition report states there was pre-existing damage, that the property required cleaning or that items were not present before you moved in, this can help you to prove the full bond should be returned to you.

If possible, take photos of the property before you move in to show its condition.

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